04 Jan

Beat the January Blues

Quarmby's Veg Web_-3

Lots of people make  “resolutions” for January –  starting the gym or a new diet… we’ve found once you call them “resolutions” you don’t tend to stick to them much..

So instead we’re just trying to change our mindset slightly to help beat the January blues by eating healthier and being more mindful of what we put into our bodies..

For a delicious yet very simple meal get started with a squash or pumpkin, here’s one of our fave’s..

1. Roast off some pumpkin or squash (scrub the skins first then pop in the oven whole and roast at 180 degrees for between 45-60 minutes for an average sized squash).

2. Take the roasted squash and halve, remove the seeds with a large spoon then cut into wedges. (You can do this first step in advance so you have ready roasted pumpkin in the fridge but I do like there to be a bit of warmth left in the pumpkin so bring it up to room temperature if you have time)

3. If the skin is soft enough it is fine to eat it (especially a Butternut Squash) so no need to peel. Layer the wedges on top of a mixed baby leaf salad.

4. Finally crumble over some Goat’s milk cheese and drizzle with your favourite dressing.

If you like, you could scatter over some toasted pumpkin seeds which will add another texture.

 

pumpkins

This as a meal in itself has lots of wonderful health benefits: 

* Heart Healthy Magnesium.

* Zinc for Immune Support.

* Plant-Based Omega-3 Fats.

* Prostate Health.

* Anti-Diabetic Effects.

* Benefits for Postmenopausal Women.

* Heart and Liver Health.

* Tryptophan for Restful Sleep

* Anti-inflammatory benefits

18 Nov

Stir up Sunday is on it’s way…

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Stir-up Sunday is the last Sunday before Advent, this year it falls on 20th November and is traditionally the day when Christmas puddings are baked, giving them a whole month to mature before Christmas. Do it the traditional way and get the whole family to help! It’s the day when wishes are said to come true, so get stirring!

What is Stir-up Sunday?

It is a tradition that harks back to Victorian times when the family would gather together to stir the Christmas pudding five weeks before Christmas. The opening words of the Book of Common Prayer read on this Sunday before Advent at church are ‘Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord’, and so the tradition stands that this is the day to get stirring!

The Stir-up traditions

  • Christmas pudding would traditionally contain 13 ingredients to represent Jesus and his disciples.
  • It is traditionally stirred (while making a wish) by each member of the family from East to West, to remember the Wise Men that visited Jesus in the Nativity Story.
  • The traditional garnish of holly represented the crown of thorns (be warned the holly berry is very toxic, so perhaps adorn your Christmas pudding with fake foliage!)
  • Adding coins, originally charms, to the pudding was said to bring luck if you found them in your pud on Christmas Day. The traditional lucky charms were a silver coin for wealth, a wishbone for luck, a thimble for thrift, a ring for marriage, and an anchor for safe harbour. Although biting on to such a thing would surely cause a trip to the dentist with a cracked tooth, so not necessarily advised without a thorough inspection on Christmas Day.

Ingredients

  • 450g white breadcrumbs
  • 1tsp ground ginger
  • 1tsp mixed spice
  • 2tsp salt
  • 225g suet, shredded or finely chopped
  • 225g brown sugar
  • 110g mixed peel, chopped
  • 110g currants & 110g sultanas
  • 450g seedless raisins
  • 75g carrots, grated
  • 3tbsp brandy
  • 2tbsp milk
  • 110g golden syrup

picture2INSTRUCTIONS 

  1. Mix the breadcrumbs, spices, salt, suet, sugar dried fruits and carrots together in a large bowl.
  2. Blend the brandy, milk and syrup and stir thoroughly into the dry ingredients.
  3. Let the mixture stand for at least 1 hour then put into a greased pudding basin or pudding steamer.
  4. If using a pudding basin cover with greaseproof paper and cloth or foil.
STEAM PUDDING ACCORDING TO THE VOLUME OF THE BASIN:
  • for a 500ml pudding allow 5 hours
  • for a 750ml pudding allow 7 hours
  • for a 1 litre pudding allow 9 hours
  1. When cooked remove the basin from the steamer and allow to cool.
  2. Cover with fresh paper and store in a cool place.
ON THE DAY OF SERVING RENEW THE COVERING AND STEAM THE PUDDING AS FOLLOWS:
  1. for a 500ml pudding steam for 2 hours
  2. for a 750ml – 1 litre pudding steam for 3 hours
  3. Turn out on to a hot dish, decorate with holly and flame with warmed brandy. Serve with brandy or rum butter.

TOP TIP

  • puddings will keep for 12-18 months and improve and mature during this time.

To finish off all the ingredients from above are available from the Deli so call in and we’ll point you in the right direction..